Center for Race & Gender
Center for Race & Gender
Center for Race & Gender
 
 

Center for Race & Gender

Annual Review 2018 - 2019

The Center for Race & Gender would like to share the stories, people, and important work that represent CRG’s mission of supporting research and scholars working at the intersection of race and gender.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
banner bw 2.jpg
 

CRG’s Reach

1,800 people spanning 26 countries

 
amCharts.jpg
 

145 Affiliated Faculty across 34 UC Berkeley Departments

 
 

Research Initiatives

Native/Immigrant/Refugee - Crossings

Islamophobia Research and Documentation Project

Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights

Arts and Humanities Initiative

Undocumented Students Research

Third World Liberation Front

 
 
With Atta Mohammad (circa 1940-2016) who was forced to become the gravedigger and caretaker of the unknown and unmarked graves (in the background) at Chehal Bimyar in Kashmir.

With Atta Mohammad (circa 1940-2016) who was forced to become the gravedigger and caretaker of the unknown and unmarked graves (in the background) at Chehal Bimyar in Kashmir.

Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Initiative

“CRG’s commitment to critical inquiry seeks to reposition relations of race and gender to enable movements for social justice. The ongoing research, rich conversations, and exciting events at CRG support critical and imaginative reformulations.”

Angana Chatterji, Co-chair, CRG Political Conflict, Gender and People’s Rights Initiative; Visiting Research Anthropologist, CRG

NICRI.jpg

Native/Immigrant/Refugee Crossings Research Initiative

Since its inception in Fall 2017, the Native/Immigrant/Refugee - Crossings Research Initiative has been awarded over $60,000 to support collaborative research that reaches across the silos the typically isolate indigenous people, immigrants, and refugees as separate fields of study. This enabled a vibrant series of events in 2018-2019. Over thirty UC Berkeley faculty have participated in this initiative.

USRI.jpg

Undocumented Students Research Initiative

What are the experiences of undocumented students at UC Berkeley at this political moment? In 2018-2019, the Undocumented Students Research Initiative conducted focus groups, interviews, and a survey, and will be issuing a report on climate for undocumented students at Berkeley. This research was made possible by grants totaling $29,500 from the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society.

IRDP 600x600.jpg

Islamophobia Research and Documentation Project

This year marked the 10th Annual International Islamophobia Conference - Virtual Internment: Islamophobia, Social Technologies of Surveillance and Unequal Citizenship. There were over 2,500 attendees throughout the seven days of the conference, and over 40,000 views online from 70+ countries. The conference resulted in the creation of the International Islamophobia Studies and Research Association.

 
Alan-CRG.jpg

“CRG has allowed me to do my research and to show that art is as important as social sciences. There is a rigor to studying art that directly impacts the way policies are formed and written.”

Alan Lopez Pelaez, Comparative Ethnic Studies, Graduate Student Researcher, Arts & Humanities Research Initiative

 
 
CreatingAltMigrant-flyer+%281%29.jpg
Anthony Hall bw.JPG
 

Third World Liberation Front

IMG_4829.jpg

“The [TWLF] anniversary rally was 50 years to the day and time that the 1969 strike began on January 22, 1969. A lot of the veterans who attended had a feeling of full circle…We brought together people who are continuing the struggle. The ‘69 veterans read the original demands, and they were eerily relevant. There’s still so much work that needs to be done.”

Marcelo Felipe Garzo Montalvo, Comparative Ethnic Studies, Graduate Student Researcher, Third World Liberation Front Research Initiative

 
 
 

In commemoration of the 50th anniversary, TWLF co-hosted a week-long conference dedicated to looking back and to the future.

To create a lasting legacy, TWLF raised over $5,000 through crowdfunding, supplementing over $44,000 in grants to create a digital historical portal that will house the history of the TWLF struggle.

 

Working Groups

Black American History Seminar

Black/Girlhood Imaginary

Indigenous Americas Working Group

Black Feminism(s) Working Group

Freedom School for Intersectional Medicine and Health Justice

twlf vets&speakers bw.jpg
Black Girlhood sq.jpg

Black/Girlhood Imaginary

"What has been great about the CRG is that it isn’t only interested in work that already has a solid foundation. Rather, it offers opportunities to working groups like ours to come with a seed. The CRG has not pressured us to produce results. Instead, we are able to process and analyze in ways that are beneficial to our work. We have been given room to explore and grow from there."

Lashon Alexandra Daley, Graduate, Performance Studies; Lead Organizer, Black/Girlhood Imaginary Working Group

IAWG 1.jpg

Indigenous Americas Working Group

In 2018-2019, the Indigenous Americas Working Group hosted Renae Watchman (Mt. Royal University), Manu Karuka (Barnard) and Robert Inness (University of Saskatchewan), organized a panel examining the Hampton and Haskell archives with Sarah Fong (USC), Bayley Marquez (UCB) and Michael Dumas (UCB), sponsored a writing workshop, and cosponsored a talk by Julie Burelle (UCSD).  The Working Group also supported the production of Beth Piatote’s Antíkoni.

 
Freedom School sq.jpg

Freedom School for Intersectional Medicine and Health Justice

"CRG has provided a comfortable, close-knit community space to talk about important and complex issues of social justice. Oftentimes, discussions and activism regarding these issues can be draining and take a lot of energy to address on a community and scholastic level, but CRG provides a grounding environment both as a physical community space but also with the interpersonal relationships that come with being part of the CRG community.”

Bernadette Lim, Graduate, UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program; Lead Organizer, Freedom School for Intersectional Medicine and Health Justice Working Group

 

The Color of New Media

The Color of New Media Working Group (2016-2017) released the book #identity: Hashtagging Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Nation (University of Michigan Press, 2019). The book is among the first scholarly books to address the positive and negative effects of Twitter on our contemporary world. Hailing from diverse scholarly fields, all contributors are affiliated with CRG’s The Color of New Media Working Group. #identity explores the intersections of new media studies, critical race theory, gender and women’s studies, and postcolonial studies. Collectively, the essays in this volume offer a critically interdisciplinary view of how and why social media has been at the heart of US and global political discourse for over a decade.

 

CRG Events 

 
0
0
0
0
 
 
 
Navigating Borders & Violence  Leisy J. Abrego & Patricia Baquedano-López

Navigating Borders & Violence

Leisy J. Abrego & Patricia Baquedano-López

Fall 2018

(click here to see full list of events)

Distinguished Lecture: Sherene H. Razack

Distinguished Lecture: Sherene H. Razack

 
Counter-Memory and Justice in Armed Conflicts  Angana P. Chatterji & Mariane C. Ferme

Counter-Memory and Justice in Armed Conflicts

Angana P. Chatterji & Mariane C. Ferme

Indivisible Tohono: Resisting Border Militarization on Tohono O’odham Land  From Left to Right: April Ignacio, Fantasia Painter, Gabriella Cazares-Kelly, and Annamarie Steven

Indivisible Tohono: Resisting Border Militarization on Tohono O’odham Land

From Left to Right: April Ignacio, Fantasia Painter, Gabriella Cazares-Kelly, and Annamarie Steven

The Place of Paris in Vietnamese Diasporic Fiction  Aimee Phan & Karl Ashoka Britto

The Place of Paris in Vietnamese Diasporic Fiction

Aimee Phan & Karl Ashoka Britto


 
Distinguished Lecture: Renisa Mawani

Distinguished Lecture: Renisa Mawani

Spring 2019

(click here to see full list of events)

Empire’s Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad  Manu Karuka

Empire’s Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad

Manu Karuka

 
Border Surveillance and the Black Mediterranean  Camilla Hawthorne & Debarati Sanyal

Border Surveillance and the Black Mediterranean

Camilla Hawthorne & Debarati Sanyal

Get Home Safe: Cross-Genre Routes Through Everyday Racism  Beth Piatote & Leigh Raiford

Get Home Safe: Cross-Genre Routes Through Everyday Racism

Beth Piatote & Leigh Raiford

#MeToo: One Year Later  Roxane Gay

#MeToo: One Year Later

Roxane Gay

 
 

Student Research Symposium

 
Session 3 – On Science, Family, and Identity     Lee-Or Scarlat ,  Undergraduate, Gender and Women’s Studies & Public Health , “Access to Fertility Preservation for Low-Income Transgender Youth in the Bay Area: Barriers, Narratives, and Looking Forward”   Victoria M. Massie ,  Graduate, Sociocultural Anthropology , “Assembling Genetic Ancestry: Race, Return, and the Materiality of Home in Cameroon”   Bernadette Lim & Nicole Carvajal ,  Graduate, UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program , “Woke WOC Docs: A Creative Multimedia Project by and for WOC in Medicine”   Louise Ly ,  Graduate, Sociology , “Gendered Racial Attraction Among Intermarried Asian and White Americans”

Session 3 – On Science, Family, and Identity

Lee-Or Scarlat, Undergraduate, Gender and Women’s Studies & Public Health, “Access to Fertility Preservation for Low-Income Transgender Youth in the Bay Area: Barriers, Narratives, and Looking Forward”

Victoria M. Massie, Graduate, Sociocultural Anthropology, “Assembling Genetic Ancestry: Race, Return, and the Materiality of Home in Cameroon”

Bernadette Lim & Nicole Carvajal, Graduate, UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program, “Woke WOC Docs: A Creative Multimedia Project by and for WOC in Medicine”

Louise Ly, Graduate, Sociology, “Gendered Racial Attraction Among Intermarried Asian and White Americans”

 
 

CRG hosted its inaugural Student Research Symposium

CRG's first ever Student Research Symposium provided an opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to present the research they accomplished with the support of CRG. Students were also mentored in how to better communicate their research findings through two workshops that preceded the Symposium. Past and present CRG grantees built knowledge and created connections together at these three convenings.

 
Symposium Banner (1).jpg
Giovanni D’Ambrosio ,  Graduate,   Sociology  &  American Studies , “Institutionalizing an Anti-Rape Politics: Imagining Need, Visioning Strategy and Building Carceral Alliances in the 1970s Bay Area”

Giovanni D’Ambrosio, Graduate, Sociology & American Studies, “Institutionalizing an Anti-Rape Politics: Imagining Need, Visioning Strategy and Building Carceral Alliances in the 1970s Bay Area”

 
 

"The biggest benefit of being a part of a program like this is that it gives you that extra boost of inspiration and gives you that community, it just makes the whole experience of research more human."

Cheyenne Seneca, Undergraduate, Sociology & Native American Studies, “Decolonizing Our Minds and Actions: Building Relationships and Mapping Community Across the Americans Indian Urban and Reserve Divide”

 
 

 Student Grantees

 
Pelican.JPG
“I think when you get funding from other places they have some sort of influence on the work that you’re producing and that influence is usually subject to normative ideas about what research is or whose knowledge matters. CRG doesn’t perpetuate that.”  —  Lee-Or Scarlat , Undergraduate, Gender and Women's Studies & Public Health, “Access to Fertility Preservation for Low-Income Transgender Youth in the Bay Area: Barriers, Narratives, and Looking Forward”

“I think when you get funding from other places they have some sort of influence on the work that you’re producing and that influence is usually subject to normative ideas about what research is or whose knowledge matters. CRG doesn’t perpetuate that.”

Lee-Or Scarlat, Undergraduate, Gender and Women's Studies & Public Health, “Access to Fertility Preservation for Low-Income Transgender Youth in the Bay Area: Barriers, Narratives, and Looking Forward”

“My research aims to build awareness of some of these less-studied political philosophies, in part so that they might be taken seriously within existing political theory debates."  — Sophie Clara Major , Graduate, Energy and Resources Group, “Indigenous Political Thought: Sechelt and Haida Theories of Sovereignty”

“My research aims to build awareness of some of these less-studied political philosophies, in part so that they might be taken seriously within existing political theory debates."

Sophie Clara Major, Graduate, Energy and Resources Group, “Indigenous Political Thought: Sechelt and Haida Theories of Sovereignty”

“Studying race is difficult and finding funding for studying race is even more difficult…[It’s great] to be able to be supported by a center that doesn’t take for granted that race is a critical aspect and I don’t have to explain myself [as to why I’m studying the world though this lens].”  —  Victoria Massie , Graduate, Sociocultural Anthropology w. DE in Science & Technology Studies, “Assembling Genetic Ancestry: Race, Return, and the Materiality of Home in Cameroon”

“Studying race is difficult and finding funding for studying race is even more difficult…[It’s great] to be able to be supported by a center that doesn’t take for granted that race is a critical aspect and I don’t have to explain myself [as to why I’m studying the world though this lens].”

Victoria Massie, Graduate, Sociocultural Anthropology w. DE in Science & Technology Studies, “Assembling Genetic Ancestry: Race, Return, and the Materiality of Home in Cameroon”

Alice Taylor , Graduate, Education, DE in Gender Women Studies, “The Youth Turn: Brazilian Youth Movements for Social Justice and Higher Education”

Alice Taylor, Graduate, Education, DE in Gender Women Studies, “The Youth Turn: Brazilian Youth Movements for Social Justice and Higher Education”

Giovanni D’Ambrosio , Undergraduate, Sociology, “The Political Construction of Survivor Support: Imagining Need and Visioning Strategy Within the Bay Area's Anti-Sexual Violence Movement”

Giovanni D’Ambrosio, Undergraduate, Sociology, “The Political Construction of Survivor Support: Imagining Need and Visioning Strategy Within the Bay Area's Anti-Sexual Violence Movement”

T(h)eresa Burruel Stone , Graduate, Education, “Pláticas y Acción Beyond the Classroom: Xicana/Latina Youth’s Navigations of Pathways to Success”

T(h)eresa Burruel Stone, Graduate, Education, “Pláticas y Acción Beyond the Classroom: Xicana/Latina Youth’s Navigations of Pathways to Success”

Pan Narez-Mendez , Undergraduate, Gender and Women’s Studies & Comparative Ethnic Studies, “Examining Hegemonic Visions of Futures in Outer Space: A Discourse Analysis of NewSpace”

Pan Narez-Mendez, Undergraduate, Gender and Women’s Studies & Comparative Ethnic Studies, “Examining Hegemonic Visions of Futures in Outer Space: A Discourse Analysis of NewSpace”

Amanda Su , Graduate, English, “Memorialization of Comfort Women in Taiwan”

Amanda Su, Graduate, English, “Memorialization of Comfort Women in Taiwan”

Fallon Burner , Undergraduate, History, “Healing Through Language: The History of the Weⁿdat Language and Weⁿdat Dialect”

Fallon Burner, Undergraduate, History, “Healing Through Language: The History of the Weⁿdat Language and Weⁿdat Dialect”

Jaleel M. Plumer , Graduate, Anthropology, “Mental Health and the Everyday Life of Caribbeans Living in the UK”

Jaleel M. Plumer, Graduate, Anthropology, “Mental Health and the Everyday Life of Caribbeans Living in the UK”

Sarah Whitt , Graduate, Ethnic Studies, DE in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, “False Promises: Race, Power, and the Chimera of Indian Assimilation 1879-1934”

Sarah Whitt, Graduate, Ethnic Studies, DE in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, “False Promises: Race, Power, and the Chimera of Indian Assimilation 1879-1934”

Bernadette Lim , Graduate, UC Berkeley-UCSF Medical Program, “Woke Woc Docs: A Creative Multimedia Storytelling Project By and For Woc in Medicine”

Bernadette Lim, Graduate, UC Berkeley-UCSF Medical Program, “Woke Woc Docs: A Creative Multimedia Storytelling Project By and For Woc in Medicine”

Krista Cortes , Graduate, Education, “African Diaspora, and Latina/o/x, Designing New Scripts: Exploring the Everyday Practices of Blackness Amongst Afro-Puerto Rican Families in California”

Krista Cortes, Graduate, Education, “African Diaspora, and Latina/o/x, Designing New Scripts: Exploring the Everyday Practices of Blackness Amongst Afro-Puerto Rican Families in California”

Kristina Echevarria , Undergraduate & Education, “Investigating the Social Influence of Dystopian Literature”

Kristina Echevarria, Undergraduate & Education, “Investigating the Social Influence of Dystopian Literature”

Xandra Ibarra , Graduate, Art Practice, “Shared Body”

Xandra Ibarra, Graduate, Art Practice, “Shared Body”

Xavier Buck  ,  Graduate, History, “What A Wonderful World: Sex, Jazz, and Blackness in New Orleans, 1850-1930”

Xavier Buck, Graduate, History, “What A Wonderful World: Sex, Jazz, and Blackness in New Orleans, 1850-1930”

Jarre Hamilton , Graduate, Anthropology, “Race, Place, and Other Things for the Taking: Archaeological Examinations of the Buffalo Soldiers and Allensworth, California, 1890-1920”

Jarre Hamilton, Graduate, Anthropology, “Race, Place, and Other Things for the Taking: Archaeological Examinations of the Buffalo Soldiers and Allensworth, California, 1890-1920”

Maria Lúa Cázares , Undergraduate, History, “The Forgotten Afro-Mexicans : Independence and the Role of Women (1800-1830)”

Maria Lúa Cázares, Undergraduate, History, “The Forgotten Afro-Mexicans : Independence and the Role of Women (1800-1830)”

Yujane Chen , Undergraduate, Ethnic Studies, “Fluid Futurities: Fish and Aquatic Creatures as Representations of Queer Migrancy in 21st Century US Poetry”

Yujane Chen, Undergraduate, Ethnic Studies, “Fluid Futurities: Fish and Aquatic Creatures as Representations of Queer Migrancy in 21st Century US Poetry”

Cheyenne Seneca ; Undergraduate, Sociology & Native American Studies, “Decolonizing Our Minds and Action: Building Relationships and Mapping Community Across the American Indian Urban Reserve Divide”

Cheyenne Seneca; Undergraduate, Sociology & Native American Studies, “Decolonizing Our Minds and Action: Building Relationships and Mapping Community Across the American Indian Urban Reserve Divide”

“[The Student Research Symposium] was a great opportunity to expand my perspective, to look at my work with fresh eyes.”  —  Monique Hossein ; Graduate, Public Health, “We Are Not Safe: Police Violence and Black Women”

“[The Student Research Symposium] was a great opportunity to expand my perspective, to look at my work with fresh eyes.”

Monique Hossein; Graduate, Public Health, “We Are Not Safe: Police Violence and Black Women”

“Having a center like CRG at Berkeley is so important, relevant, and one of the manifestations of Berkeley’s spirit.'“  — Tania Osorio Harp ; Graduate, Architecture, “Landscapes of Domestic Service"

“Having a center like CRG at Berkeley is so important, relevant, and one of the manifestations of Berkeley’s spirit.'“

Tania Osorio Harp; Graduate, Architecture, “Landscapes of Domestic Service"

“I'm really interested in the ways that race and gender are revealed/implicated in inequities in agriculture and food systems.”  —  Mindy J. Price ; Graduate, Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, “Examining the Feminist Political Economy of Indigenous Food Sovereignty in the Northwest Territories, Canada”

“I'm really interested in the ways that race and gender are revealed/implicated in inequities in agriculture and food systems.”

Mindy J. Price; Graduate, Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, “Examining the Feminist Political Economy of Indigenous Food Sovereignty in the Northwest Territories, Canada”

 

Note from the Director

 
 
Leti Volpp.jpg

2018-19 was a banner year for CRG.  We conducted innovative research, pushing borders of inquiry across myriad disciplines to better understand the impact of race and gender on questions of justice.  

Two of our six research initiatives, the Third World Liberation Front Research Initiative, and the Islamophobia Research and Documentation Project, commemorated 2018-19 as an anniversary year.  The Undocumented Students Research Initiative examined the impact of the hostile political climate on Berkeley's undocumented students.  The Arts and Humanities Research Initiative curated vibrant programming.  The Political Conflict, Gender Violence and People’s Rights Research Initiative amassed documents for its unprecedented archive on violence in conflict.  And the Native/Immigrant/Refugee-Crossings Research Initiative addressed the cutting-edge question of how indigenous, immigrant and refugee communities overlap and interact. 

We organized numerous events, providing a special gathering place for faculty and students engaged in interdisciplinary scholarship. We funded brilliant undergraduate and graduate students to conduct independent research through individual research grants, and supported working groups that bring together faculty and students to create new thought.  We mentored CRG student grantees in the process of effectively presenting their research findings through a series of programs, culminating in our inaugural Student Research Symposium showcasing their work.

Despite limited funding, CRG continues to offer our events and programs at no cost to the public.  As we continue to build on our achievements, I urge you to consider supporting CRG through a financial contribution of any size.  We count on you to help us keep CRG a key hub for new research that foregrounds questions of race and gender and makes important interventions in multiple arenas, from our local UC Berkeley campus community, to around the world.

Thank you for your support of CRG!

 
 
Volpp Signature.png
 
 

Leti Volpp, Director
Center for Race & Gender